caluminum polish, chrome polish, metal polish, brass polish, silver polish, stainless steel polish, polishing


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How to Restore and Polish Brass, Copper and Bronze - continued...

Now we polish it again, using our Museum blend. Why? Because a polish is only as fine as its coarsest component.

Museum Blend is much finer and will give you an even better finish. It also contains a p.H. neutral wax and enhancers to protect and beautify your piece.

Brass, Copper and Bronze are some of the warmest, polishable metas, giving beautiful results every time if done right!If you do a small test area on the work piece you will suddenly see small scratches that you were unable to see before in the old work. This is because the light reflected from the smoothness of the Museum polish is so bright and even it will highlight the faults of anything beside it, while the freshly polished area will be smooth and silky.

The Metal polish and Restorer doesn't have these waxes and enhancers because they would degrade its power to remove tarnish and grime, and level the surface.

The application and removal of the museum blend should be done in straight lines. It should be applied with very soft t-shirt type cotton and removed with the same. Then it should be buffed with Turkish cotton to get the ultimate results. We have, and know of customers who have pieces that do not need repolishing after 5 years!

A light dusting and maybe a gentle rub over with a clean Turkish cloth once or twice a year, depending on how much dust is in the environment is more than sufficient to maintain the finish.

The Lion that features in our photogallery is brass. It actually looks a little brassy but in a white room the reflected light is so bright it looks like chrome! It was quite cruddy when it arrived and took little over 1 hour to restore.

We recommend that when repolishing comes due, you use our Curator's Blend to restore your finish. Curator's Blend is ultra fine and has a super light cut, to ensure minimal material removal. It is too slow for the initial polishing of hard brass or bronze, but perfect for restoring and preserving a prepolished finish.

If you intend to clear coat or lacquer your finish you should use our Hot Environment polish from our automotive range. This will not interfere with the adhesion of your coating like normal wax polishes.

When the initial polishing is done it should be applied in small overlapping circles and the residue removed in straight lines.

The application of the second polish should be in straight lines, but at right angles to the first cut. This ensures that you are able to see and remove marks left from the first operation. If you decide that you want to apply the Curator's Blend immediately you should do this in the direction you finished your first polishing, to highlight any marks from the second.

Use only quality soft cotton cloths and do all your final buffing with perfectly clean Diaper cloth or better yet, Turkish cotton.

It doesn't matter if you are restoring and polishing Brass, Bronze or copper - you should treat them all exactly the same. They are all cuprates or copper based, and are particularly vulnerable to salts and acids in the atmosphere and especially on our skin. Do not handle the finished pieces without using a cloth barrier. The acids on our skin causes the worst kind of etching of them all.

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